The Biggest Financial Misconceptions About Stay-At-Home Moms

stay at home moms

We are not going to get into the whole stay-at-home mom versus working mom versus work-from-home mom (I’m the work-from-home mom) debate today. However, we are going to talk about parents who are home with their kids and really do enjoy being here with them. It seems to me that people have a large misconception about those who are home with their kids, and I thought it might be nice to set some of those things straight. Being a work-from-home mom of four, I get that there are people who have their opinions about what I do all day long (and it’s not lie by the pool with a mimosa in hand, as much as I wish it was my daily schedule). Here’s some of the biggest misconceptions about stay-at-home moms and their finances.

Stay-at-home moms are rich

It’s not even close to being the truth. Sure, some are; but most are not. Most stay-at-home moms are just moms who want to be present in their kid’s lives. Some are wealthy, some are comfortable, some are on a tight budget. All moms are different; and stay-at-home moms (at least the normal ones) don’t think poorly of moms who work, either. To each his own, sisters.

Stay-at-home moms spend, spend, spend

It goes hand-in-hand with the same thing we said above about people believing that moms who stay home with their kids are rich. Most moms home with their kids all day long don’t even have time to spend money. They’re too busy making sure the kids aren’t killing one another. You think I’m kidding…

Stay-at-home moms have to ask for money

Listen, some of you might; that’s your business. I happen to not know any moms who don’t work who have to ask permission to spend money. The moms I know happen to have a teamwork approach to their finances (as we all should) with their working spouses. They are in it together, they work within one budget and everyone in the house has to call and check in before they go out and buy something big, like a house or a car or a new living room set. I’d say people do what works for them, but being home with your kids does not mean you automatically have no money and need your husband to give you an allowance every week. Most couples view their money as just that; theirs.

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